OEM/ODM Supplier for Ginger Root Extract in Czech Republic

OEM/ODM Supplier for Ginger Root Extract in Czech Republic

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[Latin Name]  Zingiber Officinalis [Specification] Gingerols 5.0% [Appearance] Light yellow powder Plant Part Used: Root [Particle size] 80Mesh [Loss on drying] ≤5.0% [Heavy Metal] ≤10PPM [Storage] Store in cool & dry area, keep away from the direct light and heat. [Shelf life] 24 Months [Package] Packed in paper-drums and two plastic-bags inside. [Net weight] 25kgs/drum [What is ginger?] Ginger is a plant with leafy stems and yellowish green flowers. The ginger spice comes from the root...


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In the past few years, our company absorbed and digested advanced technologies both at home and abroad. Meanwhile, our company staffs a team of experts devoted to the development of OEM/ODM Supplier for Ginger Root Extract in Czech Republic, With a wide range, good quality, reasonable prices and good service, we will be your best business partner. We welcome new and old customers from all walks of life to contact us for future business relationships and achieving mutual success!


[Latin Name]  Zingiber Officinalis

[Specification] Gingerols 5.0%

[Appearance] Light yellow powder

Plant Part Used: Root

[Particle size] 80Mesh

[Loss on drying] ≤5.0%

[Heavy Metal] ≤10PPM

[Storage] Store in cool & dry area, keep away from the direct light and heat.

[Shelf life] 24 Months

[Package] Packed in paper-drums and two plastic-bags inside.

[Net weight] 25kgs/drum

Ginger Root Extract11

[What is ginger?]

Ginger is a plant with leafy stems and yellowish green flowers. The ginger spice comes from the roots of the plant. Ginger is native to warmer parts of Asia, such as China, Japan, and India, but now is grown in parts of South American and Africa. It is also now grown in the Middle East to use as medicine and with food.

[How does it work?]

Ginger Root Extract1122

Ginger contains chemicals that may reduce nausea and inflammation. Researchers believe the chemicals work primarily in the stomach and intestines, but they may also work in the brain and nervous system to control nausea.

[Function]

Ginger is among the healthiest (and most delicious) spices on the planet.It is loaded with nutrients and bioactive compounds that have powerful benefits for your body and brain.Here are 11 health benefits of ginger that are supported by scientific research.

  1. Ginger Contains Gingerol, a Substance With Powerful Medicinal Properties
  2. Ginger Can Treat Many Forms of Nausea, Especially Morning Sickness
  3. Ginger May Reduce Muscle Pain and Soreness
  4. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects Can Help With Osteoarthritis
  5. Ginger May Drastically Lower Blood Sugars and Improve Heart Disease Risk Factors
  6. Ginger Can Help Treat Chronic Indigestion
  7. Ginger Powder May Significantly Reduce Menstrual Pain
  8. Ginger May Lower Cholesterol Levels
  9. Ginger Contains a Substance That May Help Prevent Cancer
  10. Ginger May Improve Brain Function and Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease
  11. The Active Ingredient in Ginger Can Help Fight Infections
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  • https://goo.gl/31T06Y to unlock the full series of AS, A2 & A-level Biology videos created by A* students for the new OCR, AQA and Edexcel specification.

    In this video we cover the uses of polysaccharides as energy stores and structural units. On the way we’ll look the use of glucose in respiration, and then how it can be stored in the form of starch and glycogen, revisiting glycosidic bonding and introducing amylose and amylopectin. Then we will cover the bonding in cellulose making microfibrils, then macrofibrils and pectins, all the while linking structure to function. As ever there’s an exam style question to solidify everything learnt.



    Professor Maureen McCann, Director of the Energy Center at Purdue University, addresses “A Roadmap for Selective Deconstruction of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Advanced Biofuels and Useful Co-Products” on February 11, 2013 as part of the Andlinger Center’s 2012-2013 Highlight Seminar Series.

    ABSTRACT
    Second-generation biofuels will be derived from lignocellulosic biomass using biological catalysis to use the carbon in plant cell wall polysaccharides for ethanol or other biofuels. However, this scenario is both carbon- and energy-inefficient. The major components of biomass are cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Biological conversion routes utilize only the polysaccharide moiety of the wall, and the presence of lignin interferes with the access of hydrolytic enzymes to the polysaccharides. Living micro-organisms, required to ferment released sugars to biofuels, utilize some sugars in their own growth and co-produce carbon dioxide. In contrast, chemical catalysis has the potential to transform biomass components directly to alkanes, aromatics, and other useful molecules with improved efficiencies. The Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) is a DOE-funded Energy Frontier Research Center, comprising an interdisciplinary team of plant biologists, chemists and chemical engineers. We are developing catalytic processes to enable the extraction, fractionation, and depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose coupled to catalytic transformation of hexoses and pentoses into hydrocarbons. Additional catalysts may cleave the ether bonds of lignin to release useful aromatic co-products or that may oxidize lignols to quinones. In a parallel approach, fast-hydropyrolysis is a relatively simple and scalable thermal conversion process. Our understanding of biomass-catalyst interactions require novel imaging and analysis platforms, such as mass spectrometry to analyze potentially complex mixtures of reaction products and transmission electron tomography to image the effects of applying catalysts to biomass and to provide data for computational modeling. By integrating biology, chemistry and chemical engineering, our data indicate how we might modify cell wall composition, or incorporate Trojan horse catalysts, to tailor biomass for physical and chemical conversion processes. We envision a road forward for directed construction and selective deconstruction of plant biomass feedstock.

    BIOGRAPHY
    Maureen McCann is the Director of Purdue’s Energy Center, part of the Global Sustainability Initiative in Discovery Park. She obtained her undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge, UK, in 1987, and then a PhD in Botany at the John Innes Centre, Norwich UK, a government-funded research institute for plant and microbial sciences. She stayed at the John Innes Centre for a post-doctoral, partly funded by Unilever, and then as a project leader with her own group from 1995, funded by The Royal Society. In January 2003, she moved to Purdue University as an Associate Professor, and she is currently a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences.

    The goal of her research is to understand how the molecular machinery of the plant cell wall contributes to cell growth and specialization, and thus to the final stature and form of plants. Plant cell walls are the source of lignocellulosic biomass, an untapped and sustainable resource for biofuels production with the potential to reduce oil dependence, improve national security, and boost rural economies. She is also the Director of the Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), an interdisciplinary team of biologists, chemists and chemical engineers in an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

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